July 2010 Education Update

July 2010: NASA Earth and Space Science Education E-Newsletter

A monthly broadcast including upcoming educational programs, events, opportunities and the latest resources from NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.


UPCOMING PROGRAMS & EVENTS

NEW IN THIS ISSUE

(1) Climate Change Workshops for Middle and High School Teachers: (July 7-8, Aug. 4-5; Chicago, Ill.

(2) Lunar Institute for Teachers LRO Workshop for Grades 6-12 (July 12-16, Greenbelt, Md.)

(3) Online Climate Change Science and Sustainability Course (July 12-Aug. 20)

(4) High School Teacher Training: Global Climate Change Education (July 12-15, Auburn University)

(5) Online Earth Science Course for Educators-Earth’s Geophysical Systems (Course begins July 12)

(6) International Space Station EarthKAM Summer 2010 Mission: Middle School Teachers (July 13-16)

(7) Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (July 15-Aug. 20, Multiple Locations)

(8) Astronomy Education Professional Development Workshop (July 18: Portland, Ore.)

(9) K-12 Teacher Training Opportunity: Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Program (July 19-23, Apple Valley, Calif.)

(10) Climate Change Workshop for Educators of Grades 4-9 (July 19-23, Penn State University, PA)

(11) Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Conference Invites Grades 6-12 Educators (July 20-22; University of Tennessee, Knoxville)

(12) GLOBE Annual Partner Meeting and Professional Development Workshop (July 29 – Aug. 3; Calgary, Alberta)

(13) Apply to be an Intern with the DEVELOP Program: High School to Doctoral Level (Applications due Aug. 9)

(14) AMANTISS Training Workshop: For Middle School Earth & Space Science Teachers with Student Teachers in their Classrooms (Aug. 10-12, Berkeley, Calif.)

(15) Celebrate World Space Week (Oct. 4-10)

(16) International Symposium on the A-Train Satellite Constellation 2010 (Oct. 25-28, New Orleans, La.)

(17) 2010 Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest for Grades 5-12 (Entries due Oct. 27)

(18) RealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering Design Challenge for Students in Grades 9-12 (Deadline is Dec. 15)

*PREVIOUSLY BROADCAST

(19) 2010 Meeting of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (July 31-Aug. 4; Boulder, Colo.)

(20) Fifth Annual Institute for Climate Change Education (Aug. 12; St. Paul, Minn.)

(21) SETIcon: Public Science Conference (Aug. 13-15; Santa Clara, Calif.)

(22) A Day at Goddard: Opportunity for DC Metro Teachers (Grades 8-12)

(23) Solar Dynamics Observatory Ambassador in the Classroom

(24) Grades 7-12 Teachers Needed to Review Online Interactive Modules for Analyzing Earth Satellite Images


FUNDING/EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES

(25) Grades 6-16 Educators Sought to Help Shape Digital Library Project on Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness

(26) Request for Proposals: Facilitating Tribal Climate Change Adaptation Planning and Communicating Climate Change Impacts

(27) NASA Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN): 2010 K-12 Summer of Innovation (SoI) Capacity Building (Proposals Due July 16)

(28) NSF Opens Call for Informal Science Education Proposals (Preliminary proposals due July 22; Full due Dec. 7)

(29) Call for Proposals: Basic Science Observations with the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA; Proposals due July 30)

(30) NASA Accepting Proposals for Research Opportunities in Space & Earth Science (ROSES)-Multiple Opportunities (NOI due Aug. 4)


EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

(31) Space School Musical: Video, Audio & Hands-on Activities

(32) NASA Radar Images Show How Mexico Quake Deformed Earth

(33) Jupiter Impact: Mystery of the Missing Debris

(34) Journey to the Stars Planetarium Show: Free DVD

(35) NASA Earth Observatory Feature Articles


SCIENCE NEWS

(36) NASA Administrator Bolden Named Champion of Summer Learning, Kicks Off the Summer of Innovation

(37)NASA Crowns 16 Educators as Hubble ‘Top Stars’

(38) NASA Plays Key Role in New Administration Space Policy

(39) Earth-like Planets May be Ready for Their Close-up

(40) Halfway to Pluto, New Horizons Wakes Up in Exotic Territory

(41) Seventh Graders Find a Cave on Mars

(42) Strange Martian Spirals Explained

(43) NASA Releases Kepler Data on Potential Extrasolar Planets

(44) NASA Demonstrates Tsunami Prediction System

(45) Research Suggests Water Content of Moon Interior Underestimated

(46) GRACE Mission Extended Through 2015

(47) NASA Icebreaker Voyage to Probe Climate Change Impact on Arctic

(48) As the Sun Awakens, NASA Keeps a Way Eye on Space Weather

(49) NASA Rover Finds Clue to Mars’ Past and Environment for Life

(50) Old Moon Rover Beams Surprising Laser Flashes to Earth

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UPCOMING PROGRAMS & EVENTS

NEW IN THIS ISSUE

(1) CLIMATE CHANGE WORKSHOPS FOR MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATORS

(July 7-8, Aug. 4-5; Chicago, Ill.)

These two-day workshops introduce a new climate change science curriculum developed by the Chicago Botanic Garden as part of the NASA Global Climate Change Education GCCE program. The courses are held at the Chicago Botanic Garden in the Fairchild Room, and the cost per course is $150 ($140 for educator members).

Middle School Teacher Workshop: July 7-8, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Grade level: 4-8; CPDU credits: 15; CPS Lane credit: 1; Graduate Credit: 1

This workshop covers the differences between weather and climate, introduces earth systems and how they are changing, and identifies the impacts of those changes on ecosystems. Connections between climate and ecosystems will be illustrated through plant adaptations, measuring and monitoring changes in plant life-cycle events, and exploring how climate has historically impacted civilizations. Five weeks of curriculum and materials are provided.

High School Teacher Workshop: Aug. 4-5, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Grade Level: 9-12, CPDU credit: 15; Lane credit: 1; Graduate credit: 1

This workshop will cover biochemical cycles including the carbon cycle, carbon sequestration, land cover, and ecosystem change. Learn how to delineate present conditions and historical changes using GIS technology. Explore how changing climates impact economic, social, political, and societal conditions and what it means to become a sustainable society. Five weeks of curriculum and materials are provided.

Learn more and register at:http://www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl/teacherprograms/summer.php

(2) LUNAR INSTITUTE FOR TEACHERS LRO WORKSHOP (GRADES 6-12)

(July 12-16; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD)

Educators of grades 6-12 are invited to attend a workshop focused on lunar science, exploration, and how our understanding of the Moon has changed since the time of the Apollo missions. Information sent back by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and the Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) has revised some of our basic understandings of our closest celestial neighbor. Workshop participants will learn more about this and other discoveries, explore real LRO data, participate in a number of lunar science activities, and learn how to incorporate these data and activities into their classrooms.

For more information and to register for this workshop, visit: http://education.gsfc.nasa.gov/lunarinstitute/.

(3) ONLINE CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY COURSE

(July 12-Aug. 20; For Advanced High School Students, Educators, College Students, Professionals and Life-long Learners)

The State University of New York’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry is offering a one-credit online course on Climate Change Science and Sustainability. The course introduces participants to climate science, the evidence of modern climate change, and an evaluation of some of the proposed solutions.  Taught by veteran meteorologist, Dave Eichorn (AMS), Climate Change Science and Sustainability integrates NASA and other web-based climate change media with outside readings. NASA’s spatial and temporal climate change resources are the basis for most learning activities, and enable students to continue their exploration of climate change after completion of the course.

Course tuition is $207.00 plus $5.00 transcript fee (fees subject to change). Registration and payment are required by July 12. For more information about the course, including a video introduction, please visit:http://www.esf.edu/esfonline/climatechange.htm.

(4)HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER TRAINING: GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION
(July 12-15, Auburn University)

The Auburn University NASA Global Climate Change Education (GCCE) team will begin the first phase of its teacher training this July. During this first phase, the project will train 75 teachers in the Auburn University region with modules which the team has developed containing classroom activities in targeted areas of GCCE for use in the high school curriculum. Biology, chemistry and physics teachers will be trained in the use of these modules for their classroom after completing a two-day workshop through partnership with Alabama Science in Motion (ASIM), which is administered by the Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE).
Register via:https://fp.auburn.edu/asim/State%20PAGES/GCCE/GCCE%20Main.asp

(5) ONLINE EARTH SCIENCE COURSE FOR EDUCATORS: EARTH’S GEOPHYSICAL SYSTEMS

(Course runs July 12-Aug. 12)

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln offers 8- and 5-week online courses for elementary, middle and high school teachers. For more information on the courses or the Master’s of Applied Science specialization in Science for Educators, visit: http://onlinegrad.unl.edu/programs/masters/science, e-mail unlextended@unl.edu or call 402-472-5515.

(6) INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION EARTHKAM SUMMER 2010 MISSION (JULY 13-16)

Middle school educators are invited to join NASA for the International Space Station EarthKAM Summer 2010 Mission from July 13-16, 2010. This opportunity allows students to take pictures of Earth from a digital camera aboard the International Space Station.

ISS EarthKAM is a NASA-sponsored project that provides stunning, high-quality photographs of Earth taken from the space shuttle and the space station. Since 1996, ISS EarthKAM students have taken thousands of photographs of Earth by using the World Wide Web to direct a digital camera on select spaceflights and, currently, on the International Space Station.

For more information about the project and to register for the upcoming mission, visit the ISS EarthKAM home page:http://www.earthkam.ucsd.edu/.

(7) MUSIC AND ASTRONOMY UNDER THE STARS (July 15-Aug. 20, Multiple Locations)

(First event on July 15 in Washington, DC)

Dr. Donald Lubowich, Coordinator of the Astronomy Outreach Program at Hofstra University, will give concertgoers a glimpse of the heavens this summer throughout Long Island, in New York City, at the Tanglewood Music Festival, and on the National Mall in Washington, DC. Sponsored by a NASA grant, the star-gazing will include telescope observations of the sun prior to the concerts and of the moon, planets, stars, and nebulae after the events, combined with a multimedia astronomy presentation. The Amateur Observers’ Society of New York is a partner with this program.

The first event in July will be at 8:00 p.m. on July 15 at the U.S. Marine Corp. Band performance at the Sylvan Theater on the National Mall in Washington, DC. For latest information and a complete schedule, visit:http://www.hofstra.edu/Academics/Colleges/HCLAS/PHYSIC/physic_underthestars.html

(8) ASTRONOMY EDUCATION PROFESSONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP

(July 18, Portland, Ore.)

This workshop focuses on learning how to create productive learner-centered teaching environments for college-level introductory astronomy classes. Participants will achieve this through reviewing research on the nature of teaching and learning; setting course goals and objectives; and using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, lecture-tutorials, ranking tasks, and online homework systems.

For more information and to register for workshops online, visit:http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

(9) TEACHER TRAINING OPPORTUNITY: GOLDSTONE APPLE VALLEY RADIO TELESCOPE PROGRAM (GRADES K-12)

(July 19-23, Oct. 25-29; Apple Valley, Calif.)

The Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) Program uses radio astronomy to provide real science experience to students and teach them that science is an ongoing process. Using classroom computers, students take control of a 34-meter, 500-ton, 9-story-tall radio telescope located at NASA’s Deep Space Network at Goldstone, Calif.

Interested teachers must attend a five-day training class. Classes will take place in Apple Valley, Calif. Upcoming classes: July 19-23, and Oct. 25-29. The cost of the class is $745. Register, via:http://www.lewiscenter.org/gavrt/opportunities.php

(10) CLIMATE CHANGE WORKSHOP FOR EDUCATORS GRADES 4-9

(July 19-23; Penn State University, PA)

“The Heat is On!” workshop by the Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium is designed to increase teachers’ knowledge of polar and climate science as well their confidence in teaching climate change in their classrooms. ”

The workshop is a one-week, full-time, on-campus experience that includes daily interactive presentations by world-class polar and climate scientists; hands-on inquiry-based activities for use in the classroom; and the opportunity to develop thematic lessons in collaboration with colleagues. Using a new understanding of polar and climate science, participants will work in collaborative groups with a mentor scientist to develop inquiry-based lessons to use in their classrooms.

Note: Four weeks of pre-workshop assignments are designed to give participants a basic foundation in polar and climate science before they arrive on campus.

Learn more and apply today:http://teachscience.psu.edu/workshops/climate_change.html.

(11) TEACHER TRACK SESSIONS AT EARTH SCIENCE INFORMATION PARTNERS (ESIP) SUMMER MEETING (GRADES 6-12)

(July 20-22; University of Tennessee, Knoxville)

There are a few spaces left for regional teachers to attend the ESIP (Earth Science Information Partners) annual meeting at UT-Knoxville to learn about efforts to study and steward our planet. Participating G6-12 teachers will receive $200.00 stipends by participating Tuesday afternoon through Thursday afternoon while learning about Energy and Climate resources for science classrooms.For more information please visit:http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/teacherworkshop/esip/.

(12) GLOBE ANNUAL PARTNER MEETING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP

(July 29 – Aug. 3; Calgary, Alberta)

The GLOBE Program Office invites all GLOBE Partners, Country Coordinators, teachers, and science and education community members to participate in the 14th GLOBE Annual Partner Meeting and Professional Development Workshop. The theme of this meeting is “Exploring Climate Through GLOBE Student Research.”

This year’s Annual Meeting includes a three-day Professional Development Workshop designed to expand your knowledge of climate science and research as well as enhance your skill set for facilitating inquiry-based investigations of climate through the use of GLOBE materials and tools. Each day of the workshop is designed to give you the opportunity to engage in exemplary learning and research activities as well as discuss with your fellow educators how to best implement these activities in your local school setting.

Learn more at:http://globe.gov/whats_new/events/2010/annual.

(13) APPLY TO BE AN INTERN WITH THE DEVELOP PROGRAM

(Applications for fall 2010 session due Aug. 9; for High School to Doctoral level)

The DEVELOP Program is a NASA Science Mission Directorate Applied Sciences-sponsored internship that fosters the training and development of students in the atmospheric and Earth sciences. The DEVELOP Program extends the application of NASA Earth science research and technology to meet societal needs.

Students conduct projects that focus on the practical application of NASA’s Earth science research and demonstrate how results can benefit partner organizations and local communities. Advisors and mentors from NASA and partner organizations provide the guidance and support for the program. Students gain experience by using NASA science and technology in a professional setting.

Students from high school through doctoral levels are chosen in a competitive application process. The selected students work on teams at eight locations nationwide. Activities are conducted during three 10-week terms per year: summer, fall and spring.

For more information about this unique internship opportunity, please visit the DEVELOP Web site at:http://develop.larc.nasa.gov.

Questions about the DEVELOP program should be directed by e-mail to: NASA-DL-DEVELOP@nasa.govor by telephone to 757-864-3761.

(14) AMANTISS TRAINING WORKSHOP: FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL EARTH/SCIENCE TEACHERS
(Aug. 10-12, University of Berkeley, Calif.)

This is an opportunity for middle school science teachers who will have a student teacher in their class in each of the next two years, with the NASA-sponsored AMANTISS (Advancing Mentor and Novice Teachers in Space Science) project.

The project goal is to help future teachers learn how to effectively include space science topics in their future classes by supporting supervising teachers by providing training and classroom-ready materials.

AMANTISS is sponsoring 32 teachers to attend the training Aug. 10-12, 2010 at Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley, California, featuring the new GEMS Space Science Sequence for Grades 6-8. The grant provides the following for each selected mentor teacher:

  • Workshop fees and travel expenses paid to attend the August 2010 workshop in Berkeley
  • One complete GEMS materials kit and teacher’s guide for the GEMS Space Science Sequence for Grades 6-8 participants to keep
  • Another complete GEMS materials kit and teachers guide for the GEMS SpaceScience Sequence for Grades 6-8 for their pre-service teachers to take withthem to their future classrooms
  • Travel expenses to attend the 2012 NSTA National Conference joining otherAMANTISS teachers
  • A $300 stipend for their final year of participation
  • A supportive network of other supervising teachers

You can find an informational flyer and application at:

http://lhsgems.org/AMANTISS.html

(15) CELEBRATE WORLD SPACE WEEK (OCT. 4-10)

Join educators and space enthusiasts around the world to celebrate World Space Week, Oct. 4-10, 2010. This international event commemorates the beginning of the Space Age with the launch of Sputnik 1 on Oct. 4, 1957.

During World Space Week, teachers are encouraged to use space-themed activities. World Space Week is the largest public space event in the world, with celebrations in more than 50 nations. Last year, President Obama joined the celebration by hosting a Star Party at the White House.

To find NASA educational resources that can be used during World Space Week, visit the Educational Materials Finder:http://search.nasa.gov/search/edFilterSearch.jsp?empty=true.

To learn more about World Space Week, search for events in your area and find educational materials related to the event, visit:http://www.worldspaceweek.org/index.html.

(16) INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON THE A-TRAIN SATELLITE CONSTELLATION 2010

(Oct. 25-28, New Orleans, La. Abstracts due Aug. 15)

The A-Train satellite constellation brings together a rich array of instruments to better understand Earth’s changing climate and environment. The International Symposium on the A-Train Satellite Constellation 2010 is an opportunity to learn more about the A-Train system and to engage other colleagues with similar interests.

This Symposium aims to provide a forum to exchange information on the latest scientific advancements using multisensor measurements from the A-Train, and is structured along four themes: atmospheric composition and chemistry; aerosols, clouds, radiation, and the hydrological cycle; atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial components of the carbon cycle; and weather and other operational applications.

The meeting will be organized into two parts: a one-day user workshop on Oct. 25 focusing on instrument data products and their use and, a three-day symposium (Oct. 26-28) emphasizing science capabilities and advancements realized through the A-Train multi-sensor system.

The symposium is open and prospective participants are strongly encouraged to submit abstracts for poster presentations, as accommodations are available for posters to be displayed for the duration of the meeting. Only a limited number of opportunities will be available for afternoon oral presentations. The deadline for abstract submissions is Aug. 15, 2010. Travel assistance for a limited number of undergraduate and graduate students is also available.

For more information on the Syposium, including registration and lodging information, visit:http://a-train-neworleans2010.larc.nasa.gov/

(17) 2010 CASSINI SCIENTIST FOR A DAY ESSAY CONTEST FOR GRADES 5-12

(Entries due Oct. 27, 3:00 p.m. Eastern.)

The Cassini Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying Saturn. Participants examine three target images taken by the Cassini spacecraft and choose the one they think will yield the best results. This choice must be supported in a 500-word essay. Teaming up is encouraged. Winners will participate in a teleconference with Cassini scientists.

The contest is open to all students in the U.S. in grades 5-12, working alone or in groups of up to four students. The essays will be divided into three groups: grades 5-6, 7-8 and 9-12. All submissions must be students’ original work. Each student can submit only one entry.

For more information, visit:http://saturn.jpl.nasa/gov/scientistforaday/. If you have questions about this contest, please e-mail your inquiries toscientistforaday@jpl.nasa.gov.

(18) REALWORLD-INWORLD NASA ENGINEERING DESIGN CHALLENGE PHASE 1: FOR HIGH-SCHOOL STUDENTS AND TEACHERS

(Deadline to submit Phase 1 project solution is Dec. 15)

The “RealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering Design Challenge” encourages students to explore and build skills necessary for STEM careers through two phases of project-based learning and team competition.

In Phase 1, teams work cooperatively as engineers and scientists to explore and design solutions for one of two real-world problems related to the James Webb Space Telescope. Submitted final project solutions will be featured on the RealWorld-InWorld Web site and teams will receive recognition for their work. Phase 1 of the challenge can be run anytime during the next school year. Only teams who submit their final project solutions by Dec. 15, 2010 will be eligible to move into Phase 2.

In Phase 2, participating college students will select teams of 3-5 high-school students and their teacher/coach. (Each team selects an engineering mentor.) Groups will work in a 3D virtual environment using 21st Century tools to refine designs and create 3D models of the Webb telescope. Webb engineers will visit and “chat” InWorld throughout the challenge.

To learn more about the challenge and to register to explore the resources for this free and flexible project, visit:http://www.nasarealworldinworld.org/

*PREVIOUSLY BROADCAST

(19) 2010 MEETING OF THE ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY OF THE PACIFIC: ACCEPTING REGISTRATIONS AND ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS
(Boulder, Colo.; July 31-Aug. 4, 2010; Early registration deadline June 30)

This meeting will focus on ‘Earth & Space Science: Making Connections in Education and Public Outreach,’ and is hosted by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) and Geological Society of America (GSA). For more information about the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, this year’s events, and registration, visit http://www.astrosociety.org/events/2010mtg

Concurrent Symposia will include:

  • Cosmos in the Classroom: Teaching Introductory Astronomy and Planetary Science to Non-science Majors (Aug. 1-4)
  • Earth and Space Science: Making Connections in Education and Public Outreach (Aug. 1-4)
  • In the Footsteps of Galileo: A Hands-on Workshop on Astronomy for Teachers in Grades 3-12 (And those who work with them) (July 31-Aug. 1)

A set of geology hikes has been scheduled for 9:00 Sunday morning, Aug. 1. For details, visit:http://astrosociety.org/events/2010mtg/hikes.html.

To register, visit:http://astrosociety.org/events/2010mtg/registration.html.

(20) FIFTH ANNUAL INSTITUTE FOR CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION

(Aug. 12, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.; St. Paul, MN – University of Minnesota)

The Will Steger Foundation, in partnership with academic and civic partners, will look back on the last five years of climate change education outreach and curriculum development and take time to “Go Back to the Basics.” The keynote speaker is Dr. Naomi Oreskes, a renowned expert on the history of climate science, with Minnesota climatologist Mark Seeley.

Applications available online at:http://www.willstegerfoundation.org, or call 612-278-7147 to have one sent to you today.

More information at:http://www.willstegerfoundation.org. Find educational resources at:http://www.willstegerfoundation.org/educationor follow the education blog, Climate Lessons at:http://www.willstegerfoundation.org/climatelessons.

(21) SETICON: PUBLIC SCIENCE CONFERENCE
(Aug. 13-15, Santa Clara, Calif.)

SETIcon will be a family friendly event and features: noted scientists explaining new developments in everyday language; stars of science fiction TV series and movies, plus the advisors who helped with the science; panels to air controversial issues and share perspectives; special sessions where you can ask questions of your favorite guests in a smaller setting; and a family room with hands-on activities (for kids 12 and older).

The conference fee is $20 per day, or $35 for a weekend pass (banquet and Friday events extra.) Educators who attend may obtain 1 semester credit (upper division) via San Jose State University’s Bay Area Earth Science Institute (separate tuition fee). More information and registration:http://www.seticon.com/.Questions? Contact: edevore@seti.org.

(22) A DAY AT GODDARD: OPPORTUNITY FOR DC METRO TEACHERS(Grades 8-12) – Teachers in the DC Metro area are invited to bring their students to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for a day spent learning what it is like to work for NASA. Field trips include a meet-and-greet at the visitor’s center featuring a scientist and engineer, a demonstration of the Science on a Sphere program, a tour of the satellite testing facility and an inquiry based science lab activity. Programs are highly customizable, teacher-friendly and designed for grades 8-12. Contact Aleya Van Doren with your desired date and class information to reserve your spot at aleya.vandoren@nasa.gov. Slots fill up quickly so register today!

(23) SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY AMBASSADOR IN THE CLASSROOM
Let NASA take over your classroom for the day! Teachers in the DC Metro area and southern Pennsylvania are eligible for a visit from an SDO educator or scientist. Your students will learn about solar clocks, Earth’s place in the solar system, electricity and magnetism, the electromagnetic spectrum, and the Doppler effect. Visits are free, include all supplies for the activity, and can be customized for each teacher. Register at: http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/epo/educators/ambassador.php

(24) GRADES 7-12 SCIENCE TEACHERS NEEDED TO REVIEW ONLINE INTERACTIVE EARTH SATELLITE IMAGES

Indiana State University (ISU) just completed two new online interactive modules (in beta version) that involve analyzing satellite images of Earth:

  • Light (Spectral) Interactions with Earth Features
  • Temporal (Time) Changes in Biotic and Physical Environments Following Major Volcanic Activity: A Mt. St. Helens Example Using Landsat Satellite Imagery (1979-2005)

ISU seeks science teacher review comments to maximize clarity of content and ease of use by both teachers and students. Comments from teacher reviews will be used in creating a final version to be available in Fall 2010.

Reviews are needed through July. The time required for a review of a module will likely be 4-8 hours depending on the depth of a review. A reviewer can opt to review one or both of the modules.

Teachers interested should contact the Paul Mausel (paul.mausel@indstate.edu) and Dennis Skelton (dskelton1@indstate.edu) for more information relating to the nature of the review and sign-up for participation.

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

(25) GRADES 6-16 EDUCATORS SOUGHT TO HELP SHAPE DIGITAL LIBRARY PROJECT ON CLIMATE LITERACY AND ENERGY AWARENESS

Through funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Climate Literacy & Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) Pathway project is assembling, reviewing and annotating a substantial collection of online resources that will be aligned with science education benchmarks and standards.

An important part of this project is to identify the needs and “best practices” of educators related to climate science and energy topics. To do this, Inverness Research is assembling a consultant network of 100-200 teachers and college/university instructors of grades 6-16 to inform the project and gauge its reach and utility over time. Participants in this consultant network will be representative of teachers and instructors nationwide (by geographic location, subjects taught, experience level, etc.) who have an interest in teaching about climate science and energy awareness.

The study will last approximately three years. It will take one to two hours per year for an individual to participate in the consultant network: primarily in the form of completing a survey and/or participating in a short telephone interview.

Teachers and faculty who are selected to be in the consultant network will receive a total of $225 for their participation. All data collected from the network will be aggregated and the information will be used in such a way that the identity of the participants will be protected.

Applicants who meet the study criteria will be selected and sent a follow-up invitation to participate in the study as well as more information about the program.

To apply, complete the application form:http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GWZYGQ3.

(26) REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: FACILITATING TRIBAL CLIMATE CHANGE–ADAPTATION PLANNING AND COMMUNICATING CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS
(Deadline to submit proposals is July 30)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the availability of up to $550,000 to facilitate, communicate, and put in motion tribal climate change adaptation planning to respond to the projected impacts of climate change. The Agency expects to award approximately one to three cooperative agreements ranging from approximately $50,000 to $150,000 per year up to five years.

EPA requests proposals to provide direct training, technical assistance, and outreach aimed at increasing and enhancing tribal expertise in adaptation planning and climate change risk communication. Federally recognized Indian tribal governments and inter-tribal consortia, among others, are eligible.

The full announcement is available at: http://www.epa.gov/air/grants_funding.html.

(27) NASA COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NOTICE (CAN): 2010 K-12 SUMMER OF INNOVATION (SoI) CAPACITY BUILDING
(Proposals due July 16)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center released a CAN in order to identify successful summer and other out-of-school programs that currently include one or both of the first two Categories of Interest — (1) Student Achievement Impact with tangible evidence of a positive correlation between program participation and improved academic achievement in the subsequent, follow-on school year; (2) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Careers Exploration with evidence of a positive impact between program participation and increased awareness of, and interest in STEM careers and career pathways.

This CAN is available electronically through the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Evaluation System (NSPIRES). Visit:http://nspires.nasaprs.comand click on Solicitations.

(28) NSF OPENS CALL FOR INFORMAL SCIENCE EDUCATION PROPOSALS
(Preliminary proposals due July 22; Full Proposals due Dec. 7)

The National Science Foundation is soliciting proposals for the Informal Science Education (ISE) program. ISE supports innovation in anywhere, anytime, lifelong learning, through investments in research, development, infrastructure, and capacity-building for STEM learning outside formal school settings.

Read the full program solicitation:http://tinyurl.com/33a4oxs. Address Questions to the Program via telephone: (703) 292-8616 or email:DRLISE@nsf.gov.

(29) CALL FOR PROPOSALS: BASIC SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS WITH THE STRATOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY FOR INFRARED ASTRONOMY (SOFIA)

(Proposal deadline July 30, 2010)

The Basic Science program will consist of about 75 hours of on-sky exposure with either the FORCAST mid-infrared camera or the GREAT sub-millimeter heterodyne spectrometer. The observing time is expected to take place during a 2-3 month interval within the time frame of March 1 through Aug. 31, 2011.

Documents needed to consider observational possibilities and constraints, and to prepare and submit observing proposals, can be found at:http://www.sofia.usra.edu/Science/proposals/basic_science

Those documents include the Call for Proposals, the SOFIA Observers Handbook for Early Science, the Early Science Calibration Plan, exposure estimation tools and tutorials and the “Reserved Observations Catalogs” for the two instruments (Call for Proposals, Appendix A).

Proposals are invited from the world scientific community. Successful proposers with U.S. professional affiliations will be eligible to receive funding to support the acquisition, analysis and publication of Basic Science data, at a level consistent with other NASA-sponsored observing programs.

Please direct questions and comments to: sofia_help@sofia.usra.edu

(30) NASA ACCEPTING PROPOSALS FOR RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN SPACE & EARTH SCIENCES (ROSES)
(Note: There are two education opportunities/sets of deadlines) in this ROSES NRA.)

–New Investigator Program in Earth Science (for early career scientists and engineers) and Fellowships for Early Career Researchers (for early career scientists and engineers in planetary science.
(Notice of Intent is requested by Aug. 4, 2010; Full proposals due on Sept. 1, 2010.)

–Education or Outreach awards for Principal Investigators, or PIs, of selected research investigations as supplements to their research awards. Two different pathways are offered: $15K/year education pathway proposals and $10K/year outreach pathway proposals. The parent research award must have more than 12 months remaining at the time of submission of an education or outreach supplement proposal. For additional details concerning the submission of supplement proposals, please see Supplemental Outreach Awards for ROSES Investigators and Supplemental Education Awards for ROSES Investigators.
(Notice of Intent is requested by Aug. 4, 2010; Full proposals due on Sept. 1, 2010.)

For more information, visit http://tinyurl.com/y8fpbqh. Questions, comments and suggestions about the SMD E/PO program are welcome and may be directed to Larry Cooper at HQ-SMD-ROSES-EPO@hq.nasa.gov.

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EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

(31) SPACE SCHOOL MUSICAL: VIDEO, AUDIO & HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES

The solar system comes alive in “Space School Musical,” a fun and engaging 30-minute production from KidTribe, presented by NASA’s Discovery and New Frontiers Programs. The story features Hannah who is working to finish her science project, a model of the solar system. Move and groove with the planets, moons, asteroids, a meteor and comet, and some rockin’ scientists as they sing, dance, and serve up the freshest facts in the galaxy.

Nine original songs convey the science content with memorable and entertaining lyrics. The intent is for kids to watch videos, do a selection of fun, hands-on activities to reinforce the concepts in the songs and further their learning, and then create their own out of this world version of the play.

The videos, audio, lyrics, hands-on activities and more are available at: http://discovery.nasa.gov.

(32) NASA RADAR IMAGES SHOW HOW MEXICO QUAKE DEFORMED EARTH

NASA has released the first-ever airborne radar images of the deformation in Earth’s surface caused by a major earthquake — the magnitude 7.2 temblor that rocked Mexico’s state of Baja California and parts of the American Southwest on April 4.

The data reveal that in the area studied, the quake moved the Calexico, Calif., region in a downward and southerly direction up to 80 centimeters (31 inches). The maps can be seen at:http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/UAVSARimage20100623.html.

(33)JUPITER IMPACT: MYSTERY OF THE MISSING DEBRIS

Amateur astronomers were startled by a bright flash of light on Jupiter. It appeared to be an impact event–a comet or asteroid hitting the planet’s cloudtops. Curiously, though, the strike left no obvious debris. Was it really an impact–or something else?  Read the full story to find out:
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/11jun_missingdebris/

(34) JOURNEY TO THE STARS PLANETARIUM SHOW: FREE DVD

The ‘Journey to the Stars’ planetarium show surveys the mind-boggling variety of stars that dot the cosmos-exploding stars, giant stars, dwarf stars, neutron stars, even our own star. Thanks to NASA, supernovas will soon be going off in classrooms around the country-no safety glasses required. Teachers can request a free copy of the planetarium show on DVD along with supporting lesson plans and activity sheets at:journeytothestars.org.

(35) NASA EARTH OBSERVATORY: FEATURE ARTICLES

Frozen Ground: An Interview with Permafrost Expert Larry Hinzman
NASA interviews Larry Hinzman, director of the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska, about greenhouse gases trapped beneath the Arctic permafrost.

Notes from the Field Blog-Urban Aerosols: Who Cares?

Join us as NASA scientists aboard a B-200 aircraft cruise over California sampling urban pollution and other aerosols during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES).

Global Warming

Global warming is happening now, and scientists are confident that greenhouse gases are responsible. To understand what this means for humanity, it is necessary to understand what global warming is, how scientists know it’s happening, and how they predict future climate.

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SCIENCE NEWS

(36) NASA ADMINISTRATOR BOLDEN NAMED CHAMPION OF SUMMER LEARNING, KICKS OFF THE SUMMER OF INNOVATION

The National Summer Learning Association has recognized NASA Administrator Charles Bolden as a Champion of Summer Learning. The award honors Bolden’s dedication to keeping America’s middle school students engaged in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) through a new initiative called the Summer of Innovation.

Bolden officially kicked off the Summer of Innovation on June 10 at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Using content from NASA’s missions and research, the program will engage thousands of middle school students in STEM learning during the summer months when many students experience “summer slide,” or a loss of skills acquired during the school year. Summer of Innovation is a cornerstone of the Educate to Innovate campaign President Obama announced last November.

To learn more about the Summer of Innovation, visit:http://www.nasa.gov/soi

(37) NASA CROWNS 16 EDUCATORS AS ‘TOP STARS’

A planetarium show, student-authored wiki pages and a card game are among the entries selected as Top Stars in the fourth and final round of a NASA-sponsored contest that invited U.S. formal and informal educators to submit their best examples of using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope in science, technology, engineering or mathematics education.

A complete list of the 16 winners, along with downloadable materials from all Hubble activities selected as Top Stars, can be found in the Top Stars Showcase:http://topstars.strategies.org/showcase.php

(38) NASA PLAYS KEY ROLE IN NEW ADMINISTRATION SPACE POLICY
June 28 – NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden issued a statement regarding President Obama’s new National Space Policy. Bolden stated, “NASA has a key role in achieving the goals defined in the new policy. We are committed to working with other agencies, industry, and international partners to achieve national goals … that will ensure a robust future for the U.S. and our friends around the world. The new space policy sets our nation on a path to develop the next generation of capabilities we will need to live and work in space … We will reach new horizons of discovery and expand the reach of humans throughout the solar system.” To read the National Space Policy, visit: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/national_space_policy_6-28-10.pdf.

(39)EARTH-LIKE PLANETS MAY BE READY FOR THEIR CLOSE-UP
June 23 -Many scientists speculate that our galaxy could be full of places like Pandora from the movie “Avatar” — Earth-like worlds in solar systems besides our own. That doesn’t mean such worlds have been easy to find, however. These planets are notoriously difficult to observe, but a new instrument may change that.
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-207

(40)HALFWAY TO PLUTO, NEW HORIZONS WAKES UP IN EXOTIC TERRITORY
June 18 – Halfway to Pluto, NASA’s New Horizons probe has woken up in ‘exotic territory.’  Mission controllers are taking the opportunity to give the spacecraft a thorough system’s check in preparation for its Pluto flyby in 2015.
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/18jun_newhorizons/

(41)SEVENTH GRADERS FIND A CAVE ON MARS
June 17 -California middle school students using the camera on NASA’s Mars Odyssey orbiter have found lava tubes with one pit that appears to be a skylight to a cave.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-201

(42)STRANGE MARTIAN SPIRALS EXPLAINED
June 16 – For 40 years researchers have puzzled over a strange pattern of ice spirals and chasms around the Martian north pole. New data from NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter solve the mystery.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/16jun_martianspirals/

(43)NASA RELEASES KEPLER DATA ON POTENTIAL EXTRASOLAR PLANETS
June 15 – NASA’s Kepler Mission has released 43 days of science data on more than 156,000 stars. These stars are being monitored for subtle brightness changes as part of an ongoing search for Earth-like planets outside of our solar system. Astronomers will use the new data to determine if orbiting planets are responsible for brightness variations in several hundred stars.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-200

(44) NASA DEMONSTRATES TSUNAMI PREDICTION SYSTEM
June 14 -A NASA-led research team has successfully demonstrated for the first time elements of a prototype tsunami prediction system that quickly and accurately assesses large earthquakes and estimates the size of resulting tsunamis.
http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2010/jun/HQ_10-139_Tsunami_Prediction_System.html

(45)RESEARCH SUGGESTS WATER CONTENT OF MOON INTERIOR UNDERESTIMATED
June 14 – NASA-funded scientists estimate from recent research that the volume of water molecules locked inside minerals in the moon’s interior could exceed the amount of water in the Great Lakes here on Earth.
http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2010/jun/HQ_10-144_Water_In_Moon.html

(46) GRACE MISSION EXTENDED THROUGH 2015
July 10 – The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission was extended through the end of it on-orbit life, which is expected in 2015. Launched in 2002, GRACE tracks changes in Earth’s gravity field by noting minute changes in gravitational pull from local changes in Earth’s mass.
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-195

(47)NASA ICEBREAKER VOYAGE TO PROBE CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ON ARCTIC
June 8 – NASA’s first dedicated oceanographic field campaign went to sea to take an up-close look at how changing conditions in the Arctic are affecting the ocean’s chemistry and ecosystems that play a critical role in global climate change. The “Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment” mission, or ICESCAPE, will investigate the impacts of climate change on the ecology and biogeochemistry of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas.

http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2010/jun/HQ_10-135_NASA_ICEBREAKER_Voyage_Begins_June_15.html

(48)AS THE SUN AWAKENS, NASA KEEPS A WARY EYE ON SPACE WEATHER
June 4 – The sun is waking up from a deep slumber, and the next few years could bring much higher levels of solar activity. NASA is keeping a wary eye on the sun as officials meet in Washington DC on June 8th to discuss the potential consequences of stormy space weather.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/04jun_swef/

(49) NASA ROVER FINDS CLUE TO MARS’ PAST AND ENVIRONMENT FOR LIFE
June 3 -Rocks examined by NASA’s Spirit Mars Rover hold evidence of a wet, non-acidic ancient environment that may have been favorable for life.
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mer/news/mer20100603.html

(50) OLD MOON ROVER BEAMS SURPRISING LASER FLASHES TO EARTH
June 3 – A Soviet robot lost on the dusty plains of the Moon for the past 40 years has been found again, and it is returning surprisingly strong laser pulses to Earth. Researchers plan to use the aged robot to help them measure the Moon’s orbit and test theories of gravity.
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/03jun_oldrover/

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CALENDAR

July 7-8- Middle School Teacher Climate Change Workshop,http://www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl/teacherprograms/summer.php
July 12-Aug. 12 – Online Earth Science Course for Educators-Lab Earth: Earth’s Geophysical Systems,http://onlinegrad.unl.edu/programs/masters/science
July 12-Aug. 20 - Online Climate Change Science and Sustainability Course,http://www.esf.edu/esfonline/climatechange.htm.
July 12-15 - High School Teacher Training, Global Climate Change,https://fp.auburn.edu/asim/State%20PAGES/GCCE/GCCE%20Main.asp
July 12-16 -Lunar Institute for Teachers LRO Workshop (Grades 6-12),http://education.gsfc.nasa.gov/lunarinstitute/.
July 13-16 - International Space Station EarthKAM Summer 2010 Mission,http://www.earthkam.ucsd.edu/.
July 17-Aug. 20 - Music and Astronomy Under the Stars,http://www.hofstra.edu/Academics/Colleges/HCLAS/PHYSIC/physic_underthestars.html
July 18 -Astronomy Education 2010-11 Professional Development Workshop,http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm
July 18-24- Astrobiology Summer Institute for High School Teachers,http://www.seti.org/epo/ASSET.
July 19-22 - Changing Planet Faculty Study Group,http://tinyurl.com/ya9tep3.
July 19-23- Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Program (Grades K-12),http://www.lewiscenter.org/gavrt/opportunities.php
July 19-23- Climate Change Workshop for Educations (Grades 4-9),http://teachscience.psu.edu/workshops/climate_change.html.
July 20-22 – ESIP Meeting Teacher Track Sessions, Grades 6-12, http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/teacherworkshop/esip/.
July 22 – Preliminary Proposals due for NSF Informal Science Education program,http://tinyurl.com/33a4oxs
July 29-Aug. 3 - 14th Globe Annual Partner Meeting and Professional Development Workshop,http://globe.gov/whats_new/events/2010/annual
July 30- SOFIA Proposals due (basic science observations),http://www.sofia.usra.edu/Science/proposals/basic_science
July 31-Aug. 4 -2010 Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference,http://www.astrosociety.org/2010meeting.
Aug. 4 - NOI due for New Investigator Program in Earth Science & Fellowships for Earth Career Researchers,http://tinyurl.com/y8fpbqh
Aug. 4 - NOI due for E/PO Research Awards,http://tinyurl.com/y8fpbqh.
Aug. 4-5 - High School Teacher Climate Change Workshop,http://www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl/teacherprograms/summer.php
Aug. 9 - Deadline for DEVELOP Program Applications,http://develop.larc.nasa.gov
Aug. 9-12 -Climate Modeling and Data Applications Workshop,http://tinyurl.com/ya9tep3.
Aug. 10-12 - AMANTISS Training Workshop: For Middle School Earth/Science Teachers,http://lhsgems.org/AMANTISS.html
Aug. 12- 5th Annual Institute for Climate Change Education,http://www.willstegerfoundation.org
Aug. 13-15 -SETIcon Public Science Conference,http://www.seticon.com/.
Sept. 1 -NOI due for New Investigator Program in Earth Science & Fellowships for Earth Career Researchers,http://tinyurl.com/y8fpbqh
Sept. 1 -NOI due for E/PO Research Awards,http://tinyurl.com/y8fpbqh.
Oct. 4-10 – World Space Week,http://www.worldspaceweek.org/index.html
Oct. 25-28 - International Symposium on the A-Train Satellite Constellation 2010,http://a-train-neworleans2010.larc.nasa.gov/
Dec. 15 – Deadline to Submit Phase 1 Project Solution for RealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering Design Challenge,http://www.nasarealworldinworld.org/


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

NASA Science Mission Directorate:Larry Cooper, Stephanie Stockman and Ming-Ying Wei.

Editor: Theresa Schwerin, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), theresa_schwerin@strategies.org.

Writer: Catherine Fahey, IGES, catherine_fahey@strategies.org.

Contributions from:

Sheri Asplund, NASA JPL; Edna DeVore, SETI Institute; Michele Drahota, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Andrew Fraknoi, ASP; Steven Graham, NASA GSFC; Hashima Hasan, NASA HQ; Becca Hatheway, UCAR Office of EPO; Jan Heiderer, GLOBE Program; Jenifer Helms, Inverness Research; Kevin Hussey, NASA JPL; Robert Malmsheimer, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry; Barbara Mann, Virginia Space Grant Consortium; Maggie Masetti, NASA HQ; Bonnie McClain, NASA Goddard; Margaret Mooney, UW-Madison; Greg Schultz, ASP; Jennifer Schwarz, Chicago Botanic Garden; Amy Leigh Thomas, Auburn University; Aleya Van Doren, NASA GSFC; Kevin Ward, NASA’s Earth Observatory, Mitch Watkins, Space Telescope Science Institute, and Rachel Zimmerman-Brachman, NASA JPL.


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